Categorized | Food Fascinations

Birdies: the Recipe

golden-brown-birdies


When I make my own goods from scratch, I need to save as much time as possible…so I have time for the rest of life. I’ve made doughnuts, spudnuts, cake doughnuts. They are time-consuming because of the shaping and time for rising. This “Birdies” recipe is equivalent to a cake doughnut, but takes the shape of plump little chicks. If you get the constituency right, the dough strings a bit from the spoon before it enters the frying oil. This makes the roundish doughnut look like  there’s a neck and head attached to the ‘bird’. No rolling and shaping is required. Just stir it all together and drop by spoonfuls into the hot oil for deep-frying. If you like more sugar you can use icing sugar to coat them after they are cooked. I enjoy them without the extra sweetness although I’ve made pudding to use for a dip for them.

This is an old recipe used long before they came up with the commercial ‘doughnut hole’. They are small balls and therefore present a tinier portion - which I find helpful when I want to cut down on calories. (Notice that I’m writing about doughnuts along with the notion to cut down on calories…I think it’s counter-productive to cut out everything a person enjoys. I just eat a smaller amount and waaayyy slower. I can be the world’s slowest eater).

I use Rye for my Birdies and Wheat for my man’s.

BIRDIES

golden-brown-birdies

Wheat ones on the left and Rye birdies on the right.

1 cup sugar/honey

1  1/4 cup milk

3 eggs

1 tsp. vanilla

4 cups flour

4 tsp. baking powder

1/2 tsp. each of salt and nutmeg

Beat the first 4 ingredients together. Mix the dry ingredients together and add. Fry in oil at  375 F, turning after one side browns. Remove when golden brown or done into the middle.

An even quicker way to make a sweet ball like this is to use a Quick Mix – only add some sweetener and spices before frying it.

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