Seriousness of Non-Hybrids

pumpkin-seeds-for-health


Sherry: Wow, Mike Adams that published this is a ‘bird of a feather’. Right on. Right on Mike!

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Dear Natural News readers, (from insider@naturalnews.com)

Most Natural News readers are into preparedness or self-reliance at some level: they grow a garden, stockpile a bit of food or even just do their own countertop sprouting. Our readers range the gamut from urban hippies to hard-core wilderness survivalists, but the one thing everybody has in common is that they eat food.

growing-your-own-garden

Last year’s garden…such a feeling of satisfaction comes from this challenge.

Not only do we all eat food; we all need it every few hours. Right after air, water and shelter, food is the fourth most important thing needed to keep you alive. Importantly, when you don’t have food, you can be easily controlled.

Imagine a rogue government that says, “Your food allotment is now tied to your obedience in taking vaccines.” If you want to eat, you must comply.

Control of food is control of humanity. This is, of course, why Monsanto is attempting to control the world’s food supply. There’s no faster way to rise to a position of dictatorial power than to dictate whether people can eat (and what they can grow). This is why Monsanto is one of the greatest long-term threats to the survival of humanity, but that’s a topic for another article.

Stored food isn’t enough

Like me, you probably own a fair amount of stored food. This is food designed to get you through a food supply failure of some sort, and depending on your level of commitment to this stored food, you may have anywhere from 30 days to 2-3 years worth of food stored away.

yellow-pumpkin-in-my-garden

I inadvertently grew a weird yellow pumpkin from a new seed package.

Regardless of how much food you have stored, it will eventually run out. Sooner or later, you will need a way to produce new food. And that’s a whole different ball game from just storing food: You need to GROW it.

And that means having seeds.

Seeds, if you think about it, are possibly the most miraculous piece of technology in the universe. They are quite literally self-replicating food factories that generate more food and more seeds. The next generation of seeds can then be harvested and planted to produce a new generation of food. I know this sounds remedial — “Yeah, I know how seeds work!” — but have you ever stopped to think about how seeds are a self-replicating food nanotechnology from nature? They even produce their own solar collectors (leaves), and “carbon scrubbers” that pull carbon right out of the air and use it to engineer plant structure (stalks, stems, leaves, flowers, roots, etc.) Plants also grow their own antibiotics right in their roots! **

But here’s the kicker: not all seeds are self-replicating. Some seeds, called “hybrid” seeds, only grow one generation of healthy plants. Subsequent generations produce mutants that sharply deviate from the desired outcome, producing stunted growth, or distorted grains, fruits, leaves, etc.

Only so-called “non-hybrid seeds” can be grown generation after generation, reliably and sustainably. That’s why people who grow food for self-reliance always use non-hybrid seeds.

There’s also something called “heirloom seeds,” which simply means they are non-hybrid seeds that have been around for many generations and are proven producers of self-replicating food.

If you hope to survive hard times, food shortages, solar flares, martial law or whatever might be coming our way, you need non-hybrid heirloom seeds that can produce a wealth of food — and that can keep on producing it season after season!
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Sherry: On this site they also sell non-hybrid seeds and more.

** Food for thought: Bible: God commanded (everything) to multiply after its own kind.

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