Categorized | Food Fascinations, Projects

The winner is…

garden-parsnips-grow-own


Anna-Marie gets the applause. She guessed parsnip roots were on the plate in the post “What’s for Supper?”
For some strange reason, this spring’s crop were all roots except for a little 1-2″ / 3-5cm round ball. I had a big bag of them. I pondered on whether they would be worthwhile. The roots held a lot of mud. They were going to be nearly impossible to clean. Even if I got them clean – would they be tough? I decided that young small roots should be good too, but how was I going to get them clean?

Garden Parsnip Patch

Muddy Parsnip Patch

                                                                      

AAAHHHah! Idea** When I bring in baby carrots in the fall for the purposes of pickling I put them in the washing machine – that’s how I could easily wash these. I put them through a short one minute wash (no soap) and rinse cycle, in a clean washing machine, and voilà! It’s magic if you don’t let the roots dry beforehand. Then you can bring them to the kitchen sink to give them a final rinse. I like to use the spray option on my tap for that.

Garden Parsnip Roots to die for

Garden Parsnip Roots to die for

It was sooooooooooooo great and sweet. Fall harvested or ‘store bought’ parsnips don’t even touch this. The frost sweetens some things and turns other things to mush. Parsnips love frost. Warning: eat them right away – don’t leave them in the garden thinking you can make them last longer. They soon get a hard core and start to grow a seed stalk. I’ve disappointed myself already in trying to stretch out the harvest. Now they come out as soon as I can get them. There’s more than I can eat at once, of course, so they go in the fridge. You’ll always wish you had more.

;

;

;

NOTE: leave a couple of parsnip plants in the dirt to make seed for the next ‘go-round’ or if you are just beginning, plant some store purchased seed just before the last frost that freezes the ground. Alternately, you can make a trench and save some soil in a warm place to seed after the ground has frozen  Sew these seeds with a 1/2 “/2 cm. of soil on top. Leave these to mature over the next summer and leave in the ground over winter so you can eat them in the spring. Leave a couple of plants to go to seed and then scatter this seed in a new plot. Keep the rotation going.

Be a friend by sharing...Share on TumblrShare on StumbleUponShare on RedditPin on PinterestPrint this pageShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Flattr the authorTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneDigg thisBuffer this pageShare on Facebook

What do you think?